Ray Pilgrim (NDD#104) (11 Posts)

Ray grew up with Disney having visited Disneyland several times as a kid, and Walt Disney World once. He had always had fond memories of the trips, but really became a Neurotic Disney Dad when he started to take his kids to the Disney Parks. His oldest child has Autism Spectrum Disorder. So taking his kids to Disney took a little more planning and some lessons learned the hard way. To help others, he and his wife have created Disney for Families with Autism Spectrum Disorder (WDWAutism.com) to help others plan their magical trips to Walt Disney World, Disneyland, and Disney Cruise Line. WDWAutism also has planning aides to help families prepare for their trips. Rachel and Ray also produce a weekly Disney Parks planning podcast called Mouse Travel Tips.


photo credit: Ray Pilgrim

Walt Disney World has been busy lately with construction in the Magic Kingdom, and it has not all been on new Princess attractions.  They just recently improved the queue to the Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.  The queue is now an interactive queue for children of all ages.

First they increased the theming with more storybook pages on other items from the Hundred Acres Woods.  Along the queue there is a garden play area where pesky gophers can be found in the garden by either jumping on bouncing spots or playing tug of war with a gopher.  There are also musical vegetables that can be pounded on.   The queue is situated so that as a parent waits, the kids, both big and small, can play.

As the family gets further up the queue, there are storybook pages from Winnie the Pooh that have screens with honey pouring down.  You get to swipe the honey and make all sorts of designs or words as it slowly drips down. Also, as you swipe the honey, it is removed and if you work fast enough you might just see what is underneath the honey.

When I saw the queue, I thought how my kids would like it, especially my son Joshua, who has autism; and I know they would especially love the interactive screens of honey.  My only concern would be if it got too crowded.  There is enough to keep him focused and entertained, but too many people do not always help him.  The fast pass entrance, which most of the time is used as a GAC (Guest Assistance Card) entrance, takes you in right after the interactive part. My only suggestion if crowds are an issue is to make this one of your first attractions of the day, early in the morning, before the masses take over Fantasyland.

The addition of the Winnie the Pooh interactive queue was a hit for many of the people waiting.  If your child – or inner child – likes to pull, jump, pound, and even swipe, then they will love the new queue to the Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.  The queue is now almost an attraction by itself, and this time, it ends with another attraction and not a gift shop!

Contributed by: Ray Pilgrim (NDD#104) Ray is the DDL Special Needs Blogger. He is also the creator of WDW Autism.

3 thoughts on “WOULD YOU LIKE SOME HONEY WITH YOUR QUEUE?

  1. My youngest son and I are huge Winnie the Pooh fans. I can not wait to take him to the new interactive queue. Although I can not wait, I am still sad that the playground will no longer be across the way. So many happy memories there from our last visit.

  2. Thanks for this AWESOME video of the full queue and full ride!! I cannot wait just to see the tree. I might stand in line JUST for the hunny walls and other interactive elements. This boosted up a ride that was already very popular!

    38 days ’til WDW

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